Thursday, April 5, 2012

Humber

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Bicycles and sailboats - a formula for health and happiness?


Humber was a British bicycle which was produced from 1890 to 1972 - the latter 40 of those years by Raleigh.

It is interesting to me that 1957 was the year of "peak happiness" in the USA - a time when Americans consumed half as much "stuff" as they do today. Infinite growth on a finite planet is an obvious oxymoron. Happily, economic growth is not a requirement for health or happiness.

Until next, sweet sailing (and bicycling).

Tip of the hat for the picture to Don Speden of the blog Three Speed Touring In Japan

5 comments:

Baydog said...

Is that picture from the Jersey side or the Pennsy side?

Tillerman said...

Humber is perhaps better known for its cars. One of its most famous marques was Hillman. My father's first car was a pre-war Hillman Minx, a very popular model in the UK for many years.

The Humber is also a river estuary in England. I wonder if that is what the picture is meant to represent?

Humber is also one of the areas in the famous British Shipping Forecast...

Forth,Tyne,Dogger,Fisher,German Bight,
Dark waves rolling and all land far out of sight,
The distant lighthouse glow will oft impart
A sense of hope to many a sailor's heart.

Humber,Thames,Dover,Wight,
Reckless fools ignore the ocean's might.

Doc Häagen-Dazs said...

Speaking of 1957, I read today that Tokyo experienced the worse winds since 1959. Is that true?

Pandabonium said...

Baydog - no, it isn't. :)

Tillerman - thanks for the history and poem. I was going to add that an uncle of mine had a Hillman around 1960, but after thinking about it, I believe his car was a Singer.

Doc - yes indeed. 90 mph winds killed 4 people, stopped trains, grounded airplanes, and did a lot of damage. We had 40 mph winds here in Ibaraki. Wild.

Martin J Frid said...

Some of these freak storms are like operas by Wagner or Verdi, you never know what is going to happen the next minute.

Shipping Forecast - do read Nobel Prize laureate, Seamus Heaney, who captured the sense of urgency in the daily broadcasts...

"Dogger, Rockall, Malin, Irish Sea:
Green, swift upsurges, North Atlantic flux
Conjured by that strong gale-warming voice,
Collapse into a sibilant penumbra."